How Does Paint Colour Affect Your Child?

Here at eicó we are often talking to new parents about the many benefits of using our paint as well discussing paint styles, patterns and even layouts of the nursery itself. Every parent worries, it’s normal – so here is an article that will help you choose the right colours for your babies’ nursery.

White is a pure colour associated with cleanliness and innocence, but when using it, try to stay away from a completely white room and splash in some colour to match your babies’ personality helping to evoke emotion and openness. Try a5 bone and a26 shadow white as a base, then either add in accent colours of your choice (any of the below) or, add warmer beiges along with soft cosy accessories.

Orange is a very warm, cosy and comforting colour. Orange is said to promote a welcoming feeling that inspires interpersonal conversation. Darker oranges help create a more cosy atmospherewhile brighter oranges like e23 jacko lantern give a punch of modern to a babies’ nursery. Don’t over use it though, it works best as accent colour, a feature wall or alcove for example.

As much as yellow is a lively, energetic and mood enhancing colour, it’s important that you don’t use too much of it as it can agitate a baby. Opting for softer shades such as e15 butter, a h9 mackan over the brighter g19 chawka gul may be better. Or just splash the brighter g19 chawka guk to adds spots of sunshine to a room!

Green has been proven to be the best colour for a learning environment because it is such a calming, neutering and refreshing shade. Green is a superb colour to decorate with as it’s so abundantin nature, it’s also a good unisex shade to use too. We have a wide range of greens available but our favourites would be d2 apple, d13 pistachio, d7 folly or even g3 jelly with a splash of g15 limesickle and g16 gisela. However, with loads of gorgeous green shades available there’s lots for you to experiment with.

blue-kid-bedroomBlue is a healing and subtle colour but you need to be careful with the shade of blue you choose, gray-blues can lead to sadness and it’s said that you should never use blue around food (if your child struggles to eat don’t put their food on a blue plate). You may want to try warm blues like c19 blue yonder and bright blues like h27 haapsalu, which work well in a babies’ nursery. Try not to over-use darker blues or navy blues, but a splash of colours like g22 blue suede or h29 metropolitan can add warmth to a nursery.

Parents probably don’t think of using the colour purple, a hue associated with royalty, it’s a dignified, regal and mysterious colour that is rare in nature, therefore making it an unnatural colour that can look superb when used correctly. Paler, pastel purples like b7 lilac are very calming and serene, while g23 mosaic gives a more luxurious feel to a babies’ nursery.

Pink is often chosen as a feminine colour, it’s not a coincidence that little girls love the romantic, calming and loving colour of pink and it’s even said this colour works particularly well with children that are prone to tantrums. We have some gorgeous pinks available including n22 socialite and g17 blamanche that should help you create the perfect nursery for your little princess.

Reassuring for parents

These are just some of the paint colours you can opt for when painting your nursery but colours aside, you can rest assured that if you choose eicó, you have chosen the healthiest paint for your baby or child.

Why? Our paints contain zero harmful MI and VOC’s offering complete peace of mind to even the most worrisome of parents.

Proof: eicó is often chosen to complete hospital, school, office and residential projects where a ‘kind’ paint is essential for the more sensitive resident.

Our high quality paints are also durable and washable for up to 2000 scrubs! A very important factor to consider where sticky little fingers and stray crayons are concerned.

Do you have paint tips to add or photos of your newly decorated nursery? Share with us @eicopaintsCo

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